Show, not Tell

There are 3 rules for writing the novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.

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Sage Advice from Last Week

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I hope you all had a nice week off! Finals are over and we’re back in business–albeit, a bit late today. There was nothing recent that just resonated with me, so here’s an older blog post that I think is just as beneficial! When we’re all in the querying stage, this is the one thing we’ll need to pay attention to–I’m sure these Agent Pet Peeves apply to more than just the ones on the list.

Read and enjoy! (There’s even a part two.)

Written by Devin Bond

December 13, 2010 at 1:55 pm

Posted in Advice, General

Sage Advice from Last Week

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Dive into a great book

Last week I read two great posts. One was from Guide to Literary Agents. Chuck has doing an “Agent Guest Column Month” for November and I found the guest column by James M. Tabor gave me a bit of an ah-ha moment. In it he points out that the best way to get a good start on writing is to go out and live your life.

It might seem like a silly thing, but I know that I have a tendency to delve into what I’m doing and I’ll forget about the outside world. I’ll put off cleaning my room or vacuuming the house to stay in front of the keyboard and hash out whatever I can of the next scene I’ve got. (Homework is my exception.)

I think that this advice is true. It wasn’t until a road trip with Jessie last summer that she and I began writing novels with the purpose of getting them published. Going out and seeing new sights can inspire and get the creativity flowing. At least, that’s the way it is for me.

What do you think? Does getting out of the daily grind inspire or damper your imagination?

Written by Devin Bond

November 29, 2010 at 1:18 pm

Posted in Advice, Writing

Lesson 20

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Each day I go through fiction press.com and try to find interesting stories to read and review. Of course, sometimes I’m not in the mood, or there isn’t anything near 1000 words (my minimum) and sometimes I just forget. I try do 2-3 reviews and I try to be as constructive as possible–it’s good practice for critiquing. A skill that I definitely need to hone more, but that’s off topic. As I go through, I’ve noticed that there are quite a few people that forget apostrophes, spaces, hyphens and more. I think it’s common to do that at times (Jessie’ll be the first to tell you that I’m horrible with let’s vs. lets and it’s vs its.)

So, just to get it out of the way (and to show I really do know!) let’s vs lets. Let’s is a contraction of ‘let us’. Lets is the present tense of the verb let, which has quite a few meanings! The best way to make sure you’ve got the right word is to undo the contraction and see if it works. Ex:Let’s go to the store.” –> “Let us go to the store.” Or, you can check and see that it’s wrong. Ex: “She let’s go of him.” –> “She let us go of him.” Let’s doesn’t work there, so it has to be lets.

 

The Monster

Alot by Allie Brosh

 

It’s is the contraction of ‘it is’ or ‘it has’. Its is possessive. Just like with let’s/lets, you can use the same trick here! Ex: “It’s a tree.” –> “It is a tree.” Wrong would be: “It’s face.” –> “It is face.” That isn’t English, so you know it has to be its.

Sometimes we all forget, or don’t press the apostrophe key down and we end up with a word completely different than what we were going for. I often see “wont” and “cant” in the place of “won’t” and “can’t.” Wont means accustomed or used to, where as won’t is will + not. Cant is whining or begging and can’t is cannot–notice it isn’t can + not. Cannot is one word. (Also take note that can + not is legal, but it doesn’t equal the contraction “can’t”.) These seem like silly mistakes, but people make them a lot.

Speaking of a lot…

I’m going to bold this sentence because this really is the most common mistake I’ve ever seen. There is a space between the A and the word Lot. Alot isn’t a word! (Allot is, but that’s not what we’re talking about.) A friend showed me this lovely post about the wonders of Alot. Hopefully it will remind you Alot lovers that there is a space.

I could go on and on about more things like these, (like their, they’re and there, which has been beaten in since elementary school) but these are the biggest things that I see. I hope this helps at least some of you!

Written by Devin Bond

November 17, 2010 at 5:30 am

Posted in Advice, Lessons, Punctuation

Sage Advice from Last Week

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I asked a question to the ladies at Edittorrent awhile ago and Alicia Rasley answered it last week. My question was a simple one and something all of us writers have:

 

Emotional Baggage

Emotional Baggage

 

How much back story should there be?

Alicia does a great job addressing the topic, including how much to reveal, what is back story (in comparison to extraneous information), and when to introduce it.

I’ve taken up a position of “less is more,” but my wonderful critters keep mentioning all the things that I’m lacking that I think has a lot to do with this issue. If you tell too much, your story isn’t set in the present anymore! If you don’t tell enough, your characters lack some emotion and motivation.

Just like all things in life, there’s a happy medium! And I haven’t found it yet–but someday.

Written by Jessica Lei

November 15, 2010 at 6:00 am

Posted in Advice, Writing

Sage Advice from Last Week

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Pen and Paper

Free-write

This past week I read a post from Write a Better Novel about free-writing. It really helped me out with my own writing, because I’ve been getting quite a bit of writers block–or lack of motivation–lately. I’d heard of free-writing before, as I’m sure most of us have, but I never actually knew more than just not stopping your continuum of thoughts. After reading this, I tried some of the techniques. They worked! (Hurray~)

 

While it did work, it sadly didn’t get any more of the scene I’m working on written. This helped me out a lot and I hope it helps you out, too. Never doubt the benefits of free-writes! Be sure to check out part two, too. Happy free-writing!

Written by Devin Bond

November 8, 2010 at 5:30 am

Posted in Advice

Sage Advice from Last Week

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France

France

 

Last week, I asked the lovely ladies at Edittorrent about different languages in a book and what the best way to represent that while writing. I think her answer and the comments on the post are super insightful! You can check out the post here.

On the other hand, sometimes people write books and all of the characters are meant to be talking in a totally different language than what it’s written in. Some books are written in the past, like the Victorian era, or in the future. Just like with portraying the use of another language, as a writer, you need to show your readers that they aren’t speaking like we do in modern times!

Written by Jessica Lei

November 1, 2010 at 6:20 pm

Posted in Advice

Sage Advice from Last Week

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Mondays are for what gave us an a-ha moment. I was shown this post from J.A. Souders’ blog about senses. We’re all used to the five senses, but she introduces you to six more you can use in your writing. The six other senses to enhance your stories are: Time, Temperature, Pain, Balance, Motion and Direction

 

Fiery Emotions

Arson is bad for the soul.

 

She went through an exercise to practice this and I think it can only help to do it too! I didn’t follow her example to a key, but here is my try.

Logan teetered on his feet, passing his thumb through the flame of his lighter. His skin sizzled, his mouth easing into a smirk as flames encompassed the house and the wood siding crackled in the heat. A scream rose above the flames and dissipated into the night. Only twenty minutes to ruin someone’s life–twenty minutes to provide hours of entertainment.

The fire licked at his skin and the thick, black smoke burned his throat–tasted like cheap cigarettes and dark roast coffee. He’d hoped for something more exciting. The acrid scent of cedar and boiling paint was nothing. He turned to the left and dropped his lighter on the ground. Whoever said revenge was best served cold was a complete liar.

And to break it down for the six new senses, here they are in plain sight! (Just in case you missed it in the paragraph.)

  • Time: twenty minutes
  • Temperature: heat.
  • Pain: sizzled
  • Balance: teetered
  • Motion: passing, turned, teetered
  • Direction: to the left

Now that I’m aware of them, I can tell my writing will be that much better! What do you guys think? Try it out and post it up, I’d love to see your take.

Written by Devin Bond

October 25, 2010 at 5:30 am

Posted in Advice, General, Writing

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